Oklahoma wildlife group concerned about new toll road project

Hundreds of people have raised concerns about plans for a new tollway in the southeast portion of Oklahoma City’s metro. A group that helps rehabilitate wildlife said it was concerned about the impact on its property as well as wildlife in the area. Employees of WildCare Oklahoma in Noble said the road will affect the lives of thousands of wildlife. “It will cut off their access to the lake. It will destroy habitat. It will destroy wetlands that are essential for all kinds of different species, including endangered species.” Giuffrida believes increased noise and pollution would have a significant negative impact on their animals. “The proposed route of the toll highway is expected to be between a quarter and a half mile from the front of our operations, which will likely make our location untenable due to noise and pollution,” Giuffrida said. Giuffrida said she was also concerned about the impact on people who would have to abandon their land and homes for the road. to make this highway a reality. The Oklahoma House passed House Bill 4088 on Monday with a vote of 68-25. He now goes to the Senate.

Hundreds of people have raised concerns about plans for a new tollway in the southeast portion of Oklahoma City’s metro.

A group that helps rehabilitate wildlife said it was concerned about the impact on its property as well as wildlife in the area.

Employees of WildCare Oklahoma in Noble said the road would affect the lives of thousands of wildlife.

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“They can’t cross these major roads,” said Inger Giuffrida, executive director of WildCare Oklahoma. “It will cut off their access to the lake. This will destroy the habitat. This will destroy wetlands which are essential for all sorts of different species, including endangered species.

Giuffrida believes increased noise and pollution would have a significant negative impact on their animals.

“The proposed route of the toll highway is expected to be between a quarter and a half mile from the front of our operations, which will likely make our location untenable due to noise and pollution,” Giuffrida said.

Giuffrida said she was also worried about the impact on people who would have to abandon their land and homes for the road.

“Once that’s done, it can’t be undone. It has to be approached with incredible wisdom,” Giuffrida said.

State lawmakers need to pass a bill to make this toll highway a reality. The Oklahoma House passed House Bill 4088 on Monday with a vote of 68-25. He now goes to the Senate.